Skip to content

“Wikipedia is not a fucking source!!!”

November 1, 2009

Reading Gregory Levey’s October feature for Toronto Life magazine I could almost envision him sitting in a rocking chair shaking his cane angrily at the world. I clicked on the article hoping he — as an acting professor at Ryerson University —  had some insight into how higher education (and educators in general) might be adapting and evolving as technology changes not just how the next generation learns, but also the what, where, when and why of the process.

Instead, it turns out the editor gave the piece an entirely literal title. This is a lament in every sense of the word, with absolutely no solutions or insight offered up. For a self-proclaimed tethered and young person himself, it always strikes me as hypocritical when people complain about “kids these days,” as Levey is so apt to do.

Much like the ongoing hip-hop generational discourse touched on by my heady music contemporary Jef, culture as a whole tends to go through cycles of generational dissonance.

Talking to many of my peers who are now teachers in our public (and private) school systems, the incredibly over-arching complaint is uniform and simple: kids today are stupid.

And I wonder… how can this be? More than ever before, kids are bombarded not just with the ability to access and communicate with a literal global network, but with billions of packets of knowledge.

Instead of lamenting how inadequate the next generation is, why don’t we lament how poorly our antiquated ideas of education are instead? Maybe it’s time to stop expecting kids to fit into a cookie cutter model of learning derived from an era when books were a big deal?

Advertisements
2 Comments leave one →
  1. maplesyrup21 permalink
    November 1, 2009 2:11 pm

    interesting

  2. Dust permalink
    November 2, 2009 2:04 pm

    They’re kids. They’re not mature adults. Why would we expect kids to have a level of intelligence anywhere near that of an adult? As a kid, you were stupid. As a kid, I was stupid.

    Even as a first-year university student, I was stupid. I listen to the stupid conversations that young people have on the TTC, and I don’t see any more or less stupidity than I remember from that age.

    As for Gregory Levey – 2 things. 1) It’s natural to think of oneself as better than others – especially if one is in a position of authority. I’m sure he was a stupid kid too, at some point. 2) When he was a stupid kid, he didn’t have the visibility into the other stupid shit that his stupid peers were handing in.

    He should ask his own professors if they thought he was stupid.

    -d

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: